1 / 3
2 / 3
3 / 3
Brains Netra Lab

Script, Genre & Storyboard


What is script? The simplest answer is Concept-Story-Screenplay-Dialogue. A screenplay or script is a written work by screenwriters for a film, video game, or television program. These screenplays can be original works or adaptations from existing pieces of writing. In them, the movement, actions, expression, and dialogues of the characters are also narrated. In film theory, film genre refers to the method of categorizing films based on similarities in the narrative elements from which films are constructed or the emotional responses they elicit like Action, Animation, Comedy, Family, Film-Noir, Horror, Musical, Romance, Sport, War,Adventure, Biography, Crime, Drama, Fantasy, History, Musical, Mystery, Sci-Fi, Thriller, Western etc. A storyboard is a graphic organizer in the form of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of pre-visualizing a motion picture, animation, motion graphic or interactive media sequence.

Brains Netra Lab

Audition & Casting


A casting (or casting call) is a pre-production process for selecting a certain type of actor, singer or dancer for a particular role or part in a script involving a dramatic production meant for an audience. The casting process involves a series of auditions before a casting panel, composed of individuals such as the producer, director and/or choreographer. In the early stages of the process, performers often may present prepared audition pieces such as monologues or songs. These audition pieces are usually video taped, attached with resumes, and head shots and then shared with producers, directors and studio representatives. Later stages may involve groups of actors attempting material from the work under consideration in various combinations; the casting director considers both the talent of the individual actors and the chemistry of their combination.

Brains Netra Lab

Director


The director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a film, including controlling the content and flow of the film's plot, directing the performances of actors, organizing and selecting the locations in which the film will be shot, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film's soundtrack. Though directors wield a great deal of power, they are ultimately subordinate to the film's producer or producers. Some directors, especially more established ones, take on many of the roles of a producer, and the distinction between the two roles is sometimes blurred.

Brains Netra Lab

Producer


A film producer creates the conditions for film-making. The producer initiates, coordinates, supervises, and controls matters such as raising funding, hiring key personnel, and arranging for distributors. The producer is involved throughout all phases of the film making process from development to completion of a project. There may be several producers on a film who may take a role in a number of areas, such as development, financing or production. Producers must be able to identify commercial, marketable projects. They need a keen business sense, and an intimate knowledge of all aspects of film production, financing, marketing and distribution. Producers are responsible for the overall quality control of productions.

Brains Netra Lab

Camera & Cinematography


The director of photography, DoP or DP or Cinematographer is the chief of the camera and lighting crew of the film. The DoP makes decisions on lighting and framing of shots in conjunction with the film's director. Typically, the director tells the DoP how he or she wants a shot to look, and the DoP chooses the correct lens, filter, lighting and composition to achieve the desired aesthetic effect. The DoP is the senior creative crew member after the director.

Brains Netra Lab

Light, Gaffer & Grip


The gaffer is the head of the lighting department, responsible for the design of the lighting plan for a production. Sometimes the gaffer is credited as chief lighting technician. Grips are trained lighting and rigging technicians. Their main responsibility is to work closely with the electrical department to put in the non-electrical components of lighting set-ups required for a shot, such as flags, overheads, and bounces. On the sound stage, they move and adjust major set pieces when something needs to be moved to get a camera into position. In the US and Canada they may belong to the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees.

Brains Netra Lab

Art Director


The art director reports to the production designer, and more directly oversees artists and craftspeople, such as the set designers, graphic artists, and illustrators who give form to the production design as it develops. The art director works closely with the construction coordinator and key scenic artist to oversee the aesthetic and textural details of sets as they are realized. Typically, the art director oversees the budget and schedule of the overall art department. On large-budget productions with numerous sets and several art directors, one might be credited as supervising art director or senior art director. The set designer is the draftsman, often an architect, who realizes the structures or interior spaces called for by the production designer.

Brains Netra Lab

Costume Department


The costume designer is responsible for all the clothing and costumes worn by all the actors that appear on screen. They are also responsible for designing, planning, and organizing the construction of the garments down to the fabric, colors, and sizes. The costume designer works closely with the director to understand and interpret "character", and counsels with the production designer to achieve an overall tone of the film. In large productions, the costume designer will usually have one or more assistant costume designers. The costume supervisor works closely with the designer. In addition to helping with the design of the costumes, they manage the wardrobe workspace. They supervise construction or sourcing of garments, hiring and firing of support staff, budget, paperwork, and department logistics. Also called the wardrobe supervisor, although this term is used less and less.

Brains Netra Lab

Hair and make-up


The key makeup artist is the department head that answers directly to the director and production designer. They are responsible for planning makeup designs for all leading and supporting cast. Their department includes all cosmetic makeup, body makeup and if special effects are involved, the key make-up artist will consult with a special effects makeup team to create all prosthetics and SFX makeup in a production. It is common that the key makeup artist performs makeup applications on lead cast, with assistance, and allows other crew members to work with supporting and minor roles. The key makeup artist will normally execute especially complicated or important makeup processes that are to be featured on camera. A special effects make-up artist works with live models or structures in the entertainment industry, applying make-up effects and/or prosthetics. May be own department that answers directly to the director and production designer or report to Key make-up artist. The hair stylist, is responsible for maintaining and styling the hair, including wigs and extensions, of anyone appearing on screen. They assist and report to the key hair.

Brains Netra Lab

Sound Design


The sound designer, or supervising sound editor, is in charge of the post-production sound of a movie. Sometimes this may involve great creative license, and other times it may simply mean working with the director and editor to balance the sound to their liking. The dialogue editor is responsible for assembling and editing all the dialog in the soundtrack. The sound editor is responsible for assembling and editing all the sound effects in the soundtrack. The re-recording mixer balances all of the sounds prepared by the dialogue, music and effects editors, and finalizes the films audio track. The music supervisor works with the composer, mixers and editors to create and integrate the film's music. In Hollywood a music supervisor's primary responsibility is to act as liaison between the film production and the recording industry, negotiating the use rights for all source music used in a film.

Brains Netra Lab

Editing


Film editing is part of the creative post-production process of filmmaking. The term film editing is derived from the traditional process of working with film, but increasingly involves the use of digital technology.The film editor works with the raw footage, selecting shots and combining them into sequences to create a finished motion picture. Editor's cut- There are several editing stages and the editor's cut is the first. An editor's cut (sometimes referred to as the "Assembly edit" or "Rough cut") is normally the first pass of what the final film will be when it reaches picture lock. Director's cut- When shooting is finished, the director can then turn his or her full attention to collaborating with the editor and further refining the cut of the film. This is the time that is set aside where the film editor's first cut is molded to fit the director's vision. Final cut- Often after the director has had his chance to oversee a cut, the subsequent cuts are supervised by one or more producers, who represent the production company or movie studio A Telecine colorist is responsible for a grade - that is a look that has been created with a grading system, which adjusts brightness, contrast and color.

Brains Netra Lab

Visual Effect


Visual effects commonly refers to post-production alterations of the film's images. The on set VFX crew works to prepare shots and plates for future visual effects. This may include adding tracking markers, taking and asking for reference plates and helping the Director understand the limitations and ease of certain shots that will effect the future post production. A VFX crew can also work alongside the Special effects department for any on-set optical effects that need physical representation during filming (on camera.) VFX creative directors are very much like production designers, except they direct and supervise the creative side of the film's visual effects. The position is particularly in demand for films with massive amounts of computer generated imagery and scenes.